1. Barry Young
  2. Barry Young
  3. Theresa DeGrasse
  4. Gloria West
  5. Unknown
  6. Theresa DeGrasse
  7. Barry Young
  8. Unknown
  9. Unknown
  10. Unknown
  11. Dorothy Newton
  12. Dorothy Newton
  13. Title 20
  14. Unknown
  15.  Unknown
  16. Title 18
  17. Fashion Guild Of Jamaica Designs
  18. Fashion Guild Designs
  19. Daphne Logan design
  20. Daphne Logan design
  21. Daphne Logan design
  22. Daphne Logan
  23. Ruth Clarage printed label
  24. Ruth Clarage design
  25. Ruth Clarage design
  26. Ariguanabo Textile Mill
  27. Ariguanabo Textile Mill
  28. Ariguanabo Textile Mill
  29. Ruth Clarage hand printed design
  30. Ms Annie Lopez
  31. Ms Annie Lopez
  32. Pattern making Workshop
  33. Pattern making Workshop
  34. Pattern making Workshop
  35. Pattern making Workshop
  36. Pattern making Workshop
  37. Pattern making Workshop
  38. Pattern making Workshop
Fashioning Jamaica FROM colony to nation: dress and the fashionability of the African diaspora between 1950-1975 (working title).

Jamaica has a rich history of design. The National Library of Jamaica and the Jamaican Archives are filled with amazing gems detailing Jamaica's design history. Norman Manley, one of Jamaica’s independence leaders and national hero, said in 1939: 'National culture is a national consciousness reflected in the painting of pictures of our own mountains and our own women-folk, in building those houses that are most suitable for us to live in, in writing of plays of our adventures and the poetry of our wisdom, finding ourselves in the wrestle with our problems'(quoted in Fifty Years Fifty artists. 1950-2000 The School of Visual Arts. Ed. Petrence Archer-Straw). This call for the creation of a national culture, a culture that is uniquely Jamaican, has permeated every aspect of Jamaican life. It can be found in the art works of Barrington Watson, and Milton Messam, in the innovation of ceramic artists such as Cecil Baugh, in the music of Bob Marley, Lee ‘Scratch’ Perry and John Holt, and in the everyday hand painted signs that decorate the shops of Kingston, and of course in Jamaican fashion and textiles, the focus of this research.

Project:
 Jamaica’s geographic position and its position within the British Empire made it a desirable location for manufacturing. During 1950-1975 it had a thriving fashion and textile industry with Jamaican designed clothes being sold in North American stores such as Bergdorf Goodman, Ambercombie and Fitch and I Magnin. Jamaica designers were not satisfied with merely copying other designs, they sought to create designs that were 'uniquely Jamaican'. They sought inspiration from the things that they found in Jamaica. Designers such as Ivy Ralph, Annie Lopez, Daphne Logan and Ruth Claridge and textiles manufacturers; Ariguanabo Textile Mills and Jaytex all made significant contributions to the creation of a vibrant fashion history. This research looks at three Jamaican companies, Ariguanabo Textile Mill (1952-1975), Textiles of Jamaica (1964-1970) and The Jamaican Fashion Guild (1966-1974) to consider the ways in which fashion and textiles in Jamaica were produced and consumed in the construction of identities in a nation in transition.


For more information about this project please do not hesitate to contact me.      

Acknowledgements:
Thanks to the Design History Society and the University of Brighton for funding my research trip. Thanks to Nicholeen DeGrasse-Johnson, Principal at Edna Manley College (EMC), and Vashdi from the her officer, for all their help, and for the bonus tour of the EMC campus. Thanks to Carol Hamilton, Vice Principal (EMC) Miriam Smith, Margaret Stanley and Laura Lee, lecturers at EMC, for the time they spent talking to me about Jamaican fashion and textiles. I would also like to thank Pat Kentish-Skeete who graciously gave up an afternoon to talk fashion and texiles with me. And finally I would like to thank Dr Shelley-Anne Morgan who has spent numerous hours with me discussing fashion and textiles, before and during my trip.​ Also thanks to Maria Breaux, who provided the photographs of Dorothy Newton, Barry Young, my father, for allowing me to use his personal photographs, and Miss Cherry, for spending hours with me answering my numerous questions.




Contact Me
  1. Barry Young
  2. Barry Young
  3. Theresa DeGrasse
  4. Gloria West
  5. Unknown
  6. Theresa DeGrasse
  7. Barry Young
  8. Unknown
  9. Unknown
  10. Unknown
  11. Dorothy Newton
  12. Dorothy Newton
  13. Title 20
  14. Unknown
  15.  Unknown
  16. Title 18
  17. Fashion Guild Of Jamaica Designs
  18. Fashion Guild Designs
  19. Daphne Logan design
  20. Daphne Logan design
  21. Daphne Logan design
  22. Daphne Logan
  23. Ruth Clarage printed label
  24. Ruth Clarage design
  25. Ruth Clarage design
  26. Ariguanabo Textile Mill
  27. Ariguanabo Textile Mill
  28. Ariguanabo Textile Mill
  29. Ruth Clarage hand printed design